Category: 1960s Movies

The Odd Couple (1968): Let’s Put This Revisionist ‘Gay’ Angle to Bed

The Odd Couple (1968): Let’s Put This Revisionist ‘Gay’ Angle to Bed

There are many reasons why I started this blog. One of them is that as younger generations discover older films and TV shows, they are putting their own revisionist spins on what these classics are all about.

Let’s take, for example, Neil Simon’s The Odd Couple, which later became the popular TV show of the same name starring Tony Randall and Jack Klugman. We have a sportscaster, Oscar Madison (played by Walter Matthau), who practically lives like a Bowery bum in a luxurious but incredibly messy penthouse suite. We have his best friend Felix Unger (played by Jack Lemmon), who is the total opposite–refined, fussy and a neat freak.

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Bullitt (1968) vs The Detective (1968)

Bullitt (1968) vs The Detective (1968)

A few years ago, I discovered The Detective (1968) for the first time when it aired on the Movies network. When it first started, I thought it was going to be a very middle of the road mainstream police movie. Instead, I came across a movie that shocked the hell out of me on many levels, even though it was released in a time when movies were nowhere near as gritty and envelope pushing as they are today.

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Why You Should Never Call 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) Overrated

Why You Should Never Call 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) Overrated

Sighing. I am literally sighing right now as I type this. This is what I always do whenever I think about a groundbreaking movie that for no good reason at all, has been fobbed off as “overrated.” The Godfather (1972) is one of those films. Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) is another.

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Lady in a Cage (1964) is a Surprisingly Prescient Time Capsule

Lady in a Cage (1964) is a Surprisingly Prescient Time Capsule

Poor Olivia de Havilland. By the late 1950s, she had the misfortune of being an aging star from the Golden Age of Hollywood. Rather than the entertainment industry seeing her as a national treasure, she and other middle-aged actors and actresses were seen as no longer relevant in an age in which Marlon Brando and Marilyn Monroe were now the biggest box office draws.

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