Category: Movies By Genre

The Odd Couple (1968): Let’s Put This Revisionist ‘Gay’ Angle to Bed

The Odd Couple (1968): Let’s Put This Revisionist ‘Gay’ Angle to Bed

There are many reasons why I started this blog. One of them is that as younger generations discover older films and TV shows, they are putting their own revisionist spins on what these classics are all about.

Let’s take, for example, Neil Simon’s The Odd Couple, which later became the popular TV show of the same name starring Tony Randall and Jack Klugman. We have a sportscaster, Oscar Madison (played by Walter Matthau), who practically lives like a Bowery bum in a luxurious but incredibly messy penthouse suite. We have his best friend Felix Unger (played by Jack Lemmon), who is the total opposite–refined, fussy and a neat freak.

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Why Comic Book Movies are Justifiably Called Man Baby Movies

Why Comic Book Movies are Justifiably Called Man Baby Movies

Once upon a time during the Jurassic period, I was an aspiring cartoonist. When you’re interested in any industry, it’s always important to know the history behind it and get a sense of where it’s headed; and when I went to art school in the 1980s and 1990s, the comic industry in the United States was going through a major transitional period, one that goes a long way in explaining why today’s comics have gone all dark and gritty for all the wrong reasons:

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Why I Appreciate the Heartbreak Kid (1972) Now

Why I Appreciate the Heartbreak Kid (1972) Now

Once upon a time, I did not like The Heartbreak Kid, starring Charles Grodin and Cybill Shepherd. There were many reasons. The first one was that when I initially saw it, I thought it was just one tediously long set up to a very obvious and simple joke. The set up is that a guy goes to ridiculous lengths to pursue a woman who’s completely out of his league. The punchline is that as soon as he gets her, he becomes disenchanted because when you get down to it, he never really loved her; it was all about the thrill of the chase. My initial reaction was that if this was the entire point of The Heartbreak Kid, a lot more could’ve been done with this joke.

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